Post Tagged with: "Tim Houston"

Q3 2021: Extensions, Elections and Unicorns

Q3 2021: Extensions, Elections and Unicorns

December 15, 2021 at 11:52 am

My summer coverage focused on the August provincial election, although I also found time to read Barry Sheehy’s thoughts on ports and Martin Chernin’s case for extending his waterfront development contract (not exactly beach reading, but not entirely devoid of entertainment value either). September found me looking into the problemRead More

Fast & Curious: Short Takes on Random Things

Fast & Curious: Short Takes on Random Things

October 22, 2021 at 10:30 am

Home Matters So, this happened: .@HomeMattersCB asks @TimHoustonNS if he supports a container pier for CBRM. Premier says he’s willing to see a business case. #nspoli — michael gorman (@MichaelTGorman) October 21, 2021 “@HomeMattersCB” is Sydney-Membertou MLA Derek Mombourquette and I groaned out loud when I read this. Mombourquette’s ownRead More

Power to the Privacy Commissioner?

Power to the Privacy Commissioner?

August 25, 2021 at 2:21 pm

Among the many unknowns about life under Nova Scotia’s new majority Progressive Conservative government is the fate of our access to information system. While it seems unlikely things could get any worse, there is no guarantee they will get better. But even as I write, the CBC’s Michael Gorman isRead More

Civic Centre, CBRM

There’s Cecil

October 31, 2018 at 1:19 pm

Well, that’s all she wrote, folks. CBRM Mayor Cecil Clarke’s pursuit of the provincial Progressive Conservative Party leadership ended after the first ballot on Saturday, when rival Tim Houston came within 54 points of winning and Clarke bowed out. It was an abrupt ending to a campaign that seemed likeRead More

Fast & Curious: Short Takes on Random Things

Fast & Curious: Short Takes on Random Things

September 14, 2018 at 10:20 am

Revelations The experience of covering John Whalley’s civil suit against the CBRM has been revelatory: it’s clarified for me my preferred style of journalism (slow) and the contribution I can make to coverage of a local news story (details, context, history). It’s been an incredible amount of work and yetRead More

Fast & Curious: Short Takes on Random Things

Fast & Curious: Short Takes on Random Things

August 16, 2018 at 5:02 pm

Buying Ben Eoin I started to write about the recent sale of the land under the Ben Eoin Yacht Club to a group of “businessmen and doctors” as the CBC’s Tom Ayers put it, but as I hit the 1,000 word mark I realized I was writing an article forRead More

‘Premier’ Cecil Clarke Would Consider $100M CB Rail Upgrade

‘Premier’ Cecil Clarke Would Consider $100M CB Rail Upgrade

July 11, 2018 at 11:40 am

This couldn’t have been more timely: just as we’re all talking about ports again, veteran journalist and sometime Spectator contributor Rick Grant got in touch to say he’d attended the Halifax Needham PC Association AGM on June 20 and had taken the opportunity to quiz the four PC leadership candidatesRead More

Where’s Cecil?

Where’s Cecil?

June 27, 2018 at 12:32 pm

Welcome to this week’s installment of “Where’s Cecil?,” my ongoing effort to keep track of Mayor Cecil Clarke’s campaign appearances to judge just how much time he’s taking from his day job to travel the province in pursuit of the leadership of the Progressive Conservative Party of Nova Scotia. As…Read...

Fast & Curious: Short Takes on Random Things

Fast & Curious: Short Takes on Random Things

May 11, 2018 at 11:50 am

Equalization Nation Estimates put turnout for an equalization protest in front of the Provincial Building in Sydney on Wednesday at upwards of 600. Protest organizers, members of the advocacy group Nova Scotians for Equalization Fairness, have to be happy with those numbers — their message is finally starting to resonateRead More

How Maritimers (Especially Nova Scotians) Pick Political Leaders

How Maritimers (Especially Nova Scotians) Pick Political Leaders

February 14, 2018 at 12:10 pm

I wanted more information about political leadership conventions in Nova Scotia and my googling kept leading me to the same door: that of retired Acadia University political science professor Ian Stewart. Stewart and a colleague, University of Calgary political science professor David Stewart, have literally written the book on theRead More