Rachel Haliburton

Fast & Curious: Short Takes on Random Issues

Fast & Curious: Short Takes on Random Issues

October 18, 2019 at 11:11 am

First of all, thank you to the candidates who took the time to respond to our questions — Michelle Dockrill, Lois Foster, Jodi McDavid and Kenzie MacNeil. As promised, we extended the deadline to Thursday at 5:00 PM for those candidates who had not yet replied, and here are theRead More

Prime Minister Stephen Harper uses a sign to show a future 1 percent cut to the Goods and Services Tax (GST) at a Giant Tiger department store, on Friday June 30, 2006. The tax cut takes effect on July 1, 2006. JANA CHYTILOVA / OTT

Rachel Haliburton Asks About the GST

October 16, 2019 at 11:57 am

Rachel Haliburton, the Spectator’s Ethicist, who has written frequently about the necessity of taxes, asked this question of federal candidates in Cape Breton-Canso and Sydney Victoria: Given deficits are rising and healthcare in trouble, would you (or your party) consider raising the GST back to where it was before formerRead More

"Friends," oil on canvas, by Jerry Weiss, CC by 3.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en, via Wikimedia Commons

On Friendship

September 18, 2019 at 1:56 pm

Earlier this week, as of this writing, I lost a very dear friend and her death has made me reflect on the ethical dimensions of friendship. Most contemporary moral philosophers agree that there are three major ethical approaches in the Western philosophical tradition, utilitarianism, Kantianism and virtue ethics. Surprisingly, itRead More

Toronto's Eaton Centre, facing south. (Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons)

Acedia and Consumerism

September 4, 2019 at 10:04 am

I am sitting in a board game café as I write this month’s column. I have my phone on the table in front of me, and I am surrounded by young people, most of whom are using computers and/or are holding phones in their hands. Our phones and our computersRead More

Acedia and Political Polarization

Acedia and Political Polarization

July 24, 2019 at 12:19 pm

Politics today is strikingly polarized in both Canada and the United States (and, of course, in other parts of the world). People who call themselves “conservative” and those who call themselves “liberal” or “progressive” not only disagree with one another about almost everything, they seem to be inhabiting such differentRead More

Acedia By T.B. Jackson-Williams. CC BY-SA 3.0 https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=27433194

Acedia and Me (and You)

June 12, 2019 at 11:19 am

Several columns ago, I considered the difficulties a number of students seem to be experiencing, and noted that, when I discuss their situation with my colleagues, they have identified many of the same issues with their own students. The two most marked features of stress some of my students displayRead More

Sam  Wolff from Phoenix, USA [CC BY-SA 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)]

Everyone’s Lonely on Facebook

May 1, 2019 at 12:19 pm

Last month, I considered the anxiety and other forms of emotional distress that many students seem to be experiencing at North American universities. I also suggested that I think it would be wrong to attribute these mental and emotional health issues to simple inadequacy or weakness on the part ofRead More

Canary. (Photo by Juan Emilio [CC BY-SA 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)]

Are Students the Canaries in Our Coal Mines?

April 10, 2019 at 12:19 pm

Over the last few decades, universities — or, at least, many university administrators, working in tandem with ministries of education —  have increasingly embraced the idea that the role of the university is to prepare students for jobs that already exist in the marketplace. This has left many traditional universityRead More

University graduation ceremony, Ottawa. (Photo by Faustin Tuyambaze tfaustin [CC0] https://creativecommons.org/share-your-work/public-domain/cc0/
via Wikimedia Commons)

Why You Shouldn’t Buy Your Child’s Place in University

March 20, 2019 at 10:21 am

I have been thinking a lot about John Rawls’ theory of justice, in part because I am working with a fourth-year student on her honor’s thesis, but also because I’ve been watching the college admissions scandal unfolding in the United States (a scandal I find at once fascinating and appalling).Read More

Skybox, Rogers Centre, Toronto. Source: Rogers Centre https://www.rogersplace.com/premium-rentals/)

The Ethicist: Five Reasons to Tax the Rich (#5)

February 13, 2019 at 12:34 pm

The Spectator’s Ethicist, Rachel Haliburton, provides convincing — and sometimes counter-intuitive — arguments as to why making the rich pay their fair share of taxes benefits us all. (Read Reason #1, Reason #2,Reason #3 and Reason #4. For proof the Ethicist is in tune with the current Zeitgeist, read about US Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’sRead More