Sean Howard

Non-Violence is a bronze sculpture by Swedish artist Carl Fredrik Reuterswärd of an oversized Colt Python .357 Magnum revolver with a knotted barrel and the muzzle pointing upwards. Reuterswärd made this sculpture after singer-songwriter and peace activist John Lennon was murdered. There are now 32 copies of the statue around the world, including this one at the UN headquarters in New York. (Wikipedia)

Sean Howard Asks About Canada’s Role Promoting Peace

October 16, 2019 at 12:00 pm

Sean Howard, the Spectator‘s war and peace commentator, asked this question of federal candidates in Cape Breton-Canso and Sydney Victoria: In the 1990s Canada was a leader on international disarmament, receiving plaudits for its role in negotiating the ‘Ottawa Convention’ banning landmines, and earning the nickname ‘the nuclear nag’ forRead...

Artwork by Christine Gwynne.

The Chimney and the Cloud

October 9, 2019 at 1:49 pm

A more telling or ironic snapshot of endangered Mother Earth in the 21st century could scarcely be imagined: a naval war game by a nuclear-armed alliance delayed by a storm that drew its force from the human-caused warming of the oceans. The hurricane, of course, was Dorian, and the warRead More

An MH-60R Seahawk from Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 72 takes off from the flight deck of guided-missile destroyer USS Bulkeley (DDG 84) during international exercise Cutlass Fury 16. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Apprentice Colbey Livingston)

War Games: Exercising the Power to Hurt

September 4, 2019 at 10:02 am

To set the tone for their recent article on Twenty-First Century Nuclear Deterrence , four senior American nuclear war-planners approvingly quote from Arms and Influence, Thomas Schelling’s classic 1966 defense of ‘coercive diplomacy’ in the atomic age: The power to hurt – the sheer unacquisitive, unproductive power to destroy thingsRead More

Lament for a Treaty (INF Treaty 1987-2019)

Lament for a Treaty (INF Treaty 1987-2019)

August 23, 2019 at 9:19 am

I did not weep, I turned to stone inside…Dante, Inferno   I rarely cry, but on the evening of 8 December 1987, glued to radio coverage of the signing of a nuclear arms control treaty between the United States and Soviet Union, I wept with a relief I had neverRead More

An unidentified man stands by stacks of pitchblende concentrate awaiting shipment at Port Radium in 1939. Photo: Richard Finnie via NWT Archives https://www.nwttimeline.ca/1925/Popups/photo3_eldorado.htm

Canada’s Uranium Highway: Victims and Perpetrators

August 7, 2019 at 12:38 pm

On numerous occasions in recent decades, Canadian governments have apologized for a host of egregious wrongdoings. While such words of contrition are too often unaccompanied by adequate actions, they can help make visible, as Trudeau argued in his 2017 apology, the “hard truths” Canadian society needs to confront. Yet theRead More

Illustrated London  News (ILN) 10 May 1919.

Give Peace in ‘Full Meaning’ a Chance?

July 10, 2019 at 11:21 am

Editor’s Note: The Treaty of Versailles was signed on 28 June 1919, five years to the day after an assassin’s bullet in Sarajevo sparked a global conflict claiming over 20 million lives. Sean Howard reflects on a momentous centenary receiving remarkably little political or media attention.    Mischief and MadnessRead More

Campaign For Nuclear Disarmament demonstration, Westminster Abbey May 3, 2019 (source: Facebook)

Give Thanks for Weapons of Mass Destruction?

June 5, 2019 at 11:06 am

For he is our peace…and has broken down the dividing wall of hostility… And he came and preached peace to you who were far off and peace to those who were near… Ephesians 2 …and they shall beat their swords into ploughshares, and their spears into pruning hooks; nation shallRead More

Silent prayer at Lady Chapel, Glastonbury Abbey, Somerset., cropped. (Photo by Tiverton, UK [CC BY-SA 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)] via Wikimedia Commons

Brexit Reflections: Mayday from Glastonbury

May 8, 2019 at 11:34 am

Dear Spectator Readers, Mayday! Mayday! I send up this distress call from the ruins of Glastonbury Abbey (a Celtic-knot of history, myth, magic and legend; a place of long-lost glory) in a ‘United’ Kingdom rapidly losing structural and social integrity. In much of the world, today — May Day —Read More

Berkhamsted Castle, March 2019. (Photo by Lee-Anne Broadhead)

Brexit Reflection: Letter from a Ruined Castle

April 3, 2019 at 11:49 am

For God’s sake, let us sit upon the ground And tell sad stories of the death of kings; How some have been deposed; some slain in war, Some haunted by the ghosts they have deposed; Some poison’d… Richard II, Act 3 Scene 2 (‘A Castle in View’)   Dear SpectatorRead More

David B. Gleason from Chicago, IL [CC BY-SA 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)]

Close the Pentagon, Feed the World!

March 13, 2019 at 11:54 am

In 2003, Peace Quest Cape Breton launched a modest campaign for a ‘Pentagon Vacation’: a two-week (336-hour) reduction in the US Defense Department’s annual budget of $379 million (all figures in US dollars)– a saving, calculating 14 days at a Pentagon Hour (PH) rate of $42 million/hour, of around $14Read More