History

Fast & Curious: Short Takes on Random Things

Fast & Curious: Short Takes on Random Things

November 17, 2017 at 9:00 am

Port secrecy CBRM Council met in secret camera on Thursday to discuss something related to the Port of Sydney. Under the Municipal Government Act (MGA), which our mayor sometimes worries about and sometimes doesn’t (see the 31 unannounced in camera meetings held over 22 months in 2014-15 in flagrant violationRead More

Fast & Curious: Short Takes on Random Things

Fast & Curious: Short Takes on Random Things

October 6, 2017 at 11:31 am

No Cape Bretoners, please Halifax regional council has created an eight-member committee to consider the commemoration of Edward Cornwallis in the municipality. I can’t tell you who the members are because council has yet to make the names public, but if it heeded the advice of Councilor David Hendsbee ofRead More

Large Roman Missal with inlaid gold. (Photo by Ad Meskens, own work, GFDL http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html, via Wikimedia Commons)

In the Vatican, a Victory for the Vernacular

September 13, 2017 at 11:36 am

Catholics, especially those of us who’d like to see changes to much accepted as “Gospel” over the centuries, have always been informed that if changes in church doctrine or practice happened at all, they would not happen “in our lifetimes.” Of course, many changes followed Vatican II – altar railsRead More

St. Augustine, painting by Antonello da Messina c. 1472, Italy.

Summer Reading: Vacationing with Saint Augustine

August 30, 2017 at 12:08 pm

  t. Augustine’s Confessions do not repeat DO NOT make for light summer reading but there are times when one must do what one must do, so the Confessions have been on my agenda for the past while. It all started with Stephen Greenblatt’s article in the June 19/2017 issueRead More

Springhill, 1956, Draegermen entering pithead. (Source: Nova Scotia Archives https://archives.novascotia.ca/)

A Short History of Blame: The Doctrine of Progress

August 30, 2017 at 12:04 pm

Editor’s Note: This is the third in a series of essays by Susan Dodd on Nova Scotia’s history of blaming coal mining accidents on the miners themselves — a history that finally changed in the wake of the Westray disaster. You can read the first and second essays here. ThisRead More

Miners at Dominion #6 Colliery, Cape Breton, 1920. (Source: Beaton Institute https://beatoninstitute.com/dominion-13)

Letter to the Editor: ‘Getting Out the Coal’

August 30, 2017 at 12:00 pm

Editor’s Note: The following letter was received in response to Part One and Part Two of Susan Dodd’s “A Short History of Blame” series. There is no doubt mining was a dangerous occupation, particularly where gas was close to the operating surfaces and loose stone led to cave-ins. A goodRead More

Fast & Curious: Short Takes on Random Things

Fast & Curious: Short Takes on Random Things

August 18, 2017 at 9:30 am

Glace Bay Revitalization You will not be able to tell from this article, but I am working busily behind the scenes trying to piece together the timeline on the Glace Bay Revitalization project — not the 20-year timeline attached to the actual project but the months-long timeline attached to theRead More

Photographic postcard of a miner operating a long wall machine. (Source: Beaton Institute Digital Archives https://beatoninstitute.com/)

A Short History of Blame: Accident Reports from NS Mines

August 16, 2017 at 11:40 am

My undoubtedly unhealthy interest in formal reports on industrial accidents started the summer after my first year of university when my family’s copy of the report of the inquiry into the loss of the Ocean Ranger and its crew—including my oldest brother, Jim—arrived at our house. (I’ve told this storyRead More

Remembering a  Mysterious Summer of ’70 Tragedy

Remembering a Mysterious Summer of ’70 Tragedy

July 19, 2017 at 11:45 am

On 10 July 1970, three young Cape Breton men — 20-year-old Terry Burt of Sydney, 17-year-old David Burrows of Sydney River and 15-year-old Kenny Novak of Sydney River — were run over by a freight train on a track in Maine, about 45 kilometers from the Canadian border. It happenedRead More

Portrait of Siegfried Sassoon by By Glyn Warren Philpot, Public Domain, via Wikimedia Commons)

Siegfried Sassoon’s Great Refusal

July 5, 2017 at 12:10 pm

On July 28, 1917, the left-wing British newspaper Workers’ Dreadnought (founded as Woman’s Dreadnought by the suffragette leader Sylvia Pankhurst) published an Open Letter from an unlikely source: the highly-decorated, reputedly-fearless Infantry Officer Siegfried ‘Mad Jack’ Sassoon. Recuperating from a throat wound, and nursing secret doubts about the nearly three-year-oldRead More