Society

Photographic postcard of a miner operating a long wall machine. (Source: Beaton Institute Digital Archives https://beatoninstitute.com/)

A Short History of Blame: Accident Reports from NS Mines

August 16, 2017 at 11:40 am

Editor’s Note: This is the first in a series of essays by Susan Dodd on Nova Scotia’s history of blaming coal mining accidents on the miners themselves — a history that finally changed in the wake of the Westray disaster. You can read second and third and fourth essays by clicking theRead More

CB Post Downplays Donkin Safety Issues

CB Post Downplays Donkin Safety Issues

August 9, 2017 at 12:04 pm

News that the owners of the Donkin Mine have been hit with 29 safety violations and 10 compliance orders since operations began in February received markedly different coverage from the CBC and our local, pro-coal, daily newspaper. Here’s the story as it appeared on the CBC website: And here’s theRead More

Mushroom cloud above Nagasaki after atomic bombing on August 9, 1945. Taken from the north west. Charles Levy from one of the B-29 Superfortresses used in the attack. (Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons)

Heeding the Message of Nagasaki

August 9, 2017 at 12:03 pm

At 11:02 A.M. on 9 August 1945, an American B-29 bomber dropped a single bomb on the Japanese port city of Nagasaki. The bomb, nicknamed ‘Fat Man,’ contained a baseball of plutonium surrounded by 64 packs of high-explosive, timed to compress the warhead to a critical mass. As Susan SouthardRead More

New Waterford No. 12 Colliery/Westray

Donkin Mine Violations: Failures of ‘Learning?’

August 9, 2017 at 12:02 pm

“It was tragedies like that, unfortunately, that led to better health and safety regulations in the mines and made it a lot safer for generations to come,” said Bob Burchell, the United Mine Workers of America’s (UMWA) interim international representative for Canada, on the eve of a July 25 ceremonyRead More

The Ethicist: Thinking and Feeling

The Ethicist: Thinking and Feeling

August 2, 2017 at 11:45 am

I recently read an article that fascinated me. It was about a conversation between President Donald Trump and the mayor of a small island off the coast of Virginia that is quickly disappearing beneath the water as sea levels rise. The article is accompanied by a short video that demonstratesRead More

Fast & Curious: Short Takes on Random Things

Fast & Curious: Short Takes on Random Things

August 2, 2017 at 11:30 am

The Mooch As brushes with celebrity go, it’s not much of one, but I almost interviewed Anthony Scaramucci. At the time, I didn’t much care when my boss decided it would be easier to do the interview herself, but in light of his meteoric political rise and fall —  IRead More

Public Housing & the Single, Non-Senior

Public Housing & the Single, Non-Senior

July 26, 2017 at 11:45 am

Editor’s Note: This is an article I’ve been working on for over a month now and it barely scratches the surface of the issue it deals with, namely, the housing problems faced by single, non-seniors in the CBRM. If you have information to add or angles you’d like to seeRead More

Fast & Curious: Short Takes on Random Things

Fast & Curious: Short Takes on Random Things

July 26, 2017 at 11:30 am

Editor’s Note: Fast & Curious is appearing today because the Spectator has family in town and needs some beach and Crazy Eights time. (She loses, usually badly, at the latter in case you’re wondering).   Friday Night Lightning Friday night brought a thunder and lightning storm of Biblical proportions toRead...

Fast & Curious: Short Takes on Random Things

Fast & Curious: Short Takes on Random Things

July 21, 2017 at 10:00 am

Quote of the week We’ve been at it for three-and-a-half years, I would say if you reference any of those major developments you’re looking at a 10-year cycle. We’re well within, and much shorter than one could imagine. I think we are in very good shape, I think we’re betterRead More

Remembering a  Mysterious Summer of ’70 Tragedy

Remembering a Mysterious Summer of ’70 Tragedy

July 19, 2017 at 11:45 am

On 10 July 1970, three young Cape Breton men — 20-year-old Terry Burt of Sydney, 17-year-old David Burrows of Sydney River and 15-year-old Kenny Novak of Sydney River — were run over by a freight train on a track in Maine, about 45 kilometers from the Canadian border. It happenedRead More