Science

Fast & Curious: Short Takes on Random Things

Fast & Curious: Short Takes on Random Things

April 12, 2019 at 9:20 am

Caveat emptor So, this happened:   Ian Scott elaborated on the lawsuit in an interview with Ryan Ross of Charlottetown’s Guardian newspaper (also part of the SaltWire empire) saying: “If your counterparty is not being honest or is hiding things, there’s a lot of stuff that you can’t really determineRead More

Canary. (Photo by Juan Emilio [CC BY-SA 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)]

Are Students the Canaries in Our Coal Mines?

April 10, 2019 at 12:19 pm

Over the last few decades, universities — or, at least, many university administrators, working in tandem with ministries of education —  have increasingly embraced the idea that the role of the university is to prepare students for jobs that already exist in the marketplace. This has left many traditional universityRead More

Lotus Head from Johannesburg, Gauteng, South Africa [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/)]

And Now, a Word from Your Planet

April 10, 2019 at 12:17 pm

Note:  Climate change is freaking me out. More to the point: our general refusal to acknowledge the threat of climate change is freaking me out. This province is cutting down trees and digging up coal and threatening the health of rivers like it was 1819, not 2019, so I’ve decidedRead More

Artist's rendering of new CBRL Central Library. 2019.

On the Waterfront Part I

March 27, 2019 at 12:28 pm

I have been trying to determine how, exactly, we decided to locate the new CBRM central library on the Sydney waterfront and as best I can figure, it happened like this:   Architectural & Facility Planning In June 2011, the Cape Breton Regional Library (CBRL) Board initiated a study toRead More

A wave hits a rock on Bengtskär, Finnish Gulf.(Pöllö [CC BY 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)]

On the Waterfront Part II

March 27, 2019 at 12:26 pm

I need to begin by saying that despite my misgivings about the location of the planned new library and my dislike of the way it’s been tangled up in a private development, I am excited about it. I would just like to ensure that it’s around to excite future generationsRead More

Fast & Curious: Short Takes on Random Things

Fast & Curious: Short Takes on Random Things

March 1, 2019 at 11:57 am

Lord of the Dance The Cape Breton Post devoted three pages — including the entire front page — to the late John Allan Cameron on Tuesday, inadvertently giving new meaning to the phrase “slow news day.” The hook for the multi-page extravaganza? It’s been 50 years since Cameron’s first albumRead More

Fast & Curious: Short Takes on Random Things

Fast & Curious: Short Takes on Random Things

January 25, 2019 at 9:45 am

Deep Dives The banner across the top of this morning’s Cape Breton Post gave me pause, I’ll admit it: The SaltWire Deep Dives: Looking at the Doctor Shortage in Atlantic Canada. Today: Where are all the doctors? “Deep dives?” I thought. “That’s my thing.” I was nervous, but I hadRead More

Fast & Curious: Short Takes on Random Things

Fast & Curious: Short Takes on Random Things

November 9, 2018 at 10:00 am

In camera The CBC’s Tom Ayers doesn’t seem to like closed doors any more than I do and this week he kicked one open (figuratively, not literally) at the Cape Breton Regional Municipality. Ayers reported on Thursday that the CBRM Council has discussed its own compensation in secret four timesRead More

Fast & Curious: Short Takes on Random Things

Fast & Curious: Short Takes on Random Things

October 26, 2018 at 10:45 am

OK, Stop Councilor! After reading Thursday morning’s Cape Breton Post, I have an overwhelming urge to speak directly to District 4 Councilor Steve Gillespie (In fact, I was speaking to him but I don’t think he heard me). I don’t think he’ll read this either, but for the sake ofRead More

Clarke on Carbon Pricing: Ready to Lead?

Clarke on Carbon Pricing: Ready to Lead?

October 24, 2018 at 12:51 pm

Cecil Clarke is not the only anti-carbon tax politician in the current landscape; in fact, he’s arguably just the homegrown version of a familiar figure on the political scene — the “Canadian conservative” who, as Dalhousie economist Lars Osberg puts it, has “successfully framed” the federal government’s carbon-pricing system as aRead More