Cecil Clarke

Fast & Curious: Short Takes on Random Things

Fast & Curious: Short Takes on Random Things

December 7, 2018 at 11:20 am

ServiCom There is absolutely no humor to be found in the announcement that 600 Cape Bretoners have lost their jobsĀ  three weeks before Christmas with the closure of the ServiCom call center. Even Mayor Cecil Clarke’s mixing of metaphors (he’s hoping the potential sale of the local ServiCom branch willRead More

Meeting to Discuss Future Meetings

Meeting to Discuss Future Meetings

December 5, 2018 at 12:38 pm

CBRM Council met this morning to decide what it’s going to discuss at future meetings. If I understand Mayor Cecil Clarke correctly, he has been compiling this list (which is not exhaustive) based on what he has been hearing from citizens. The topics are “in no order whatsoever” and thisRead More

Fast & Curious: Short Takes on Random Things

Fast & Curious: Short Takes on Random Things

November 23, 2018 at 9:48 am

News in the news Federal Finance Minister Bill Morneau’s fall economic statement includes a section labeled, “Support for Canadian Journalism.” I’ve been reading it this morning, but I fear all I really need to know about it is this: Paul Godfrey, the CEO of Postmedia, which publishes the National PostRead More

CBRM Council: Miscellanea

CBRM Council: Miscellanea

November 21, 2018 at 1:00 pm

CBRM Council met for 18 hours last night (okay, not 18 hours, but it felt like 18 hours, I don’t know how they do it). Here are some quick hits from the agenda:   Library Once again, I was left wondering what exactly is the relationship between businessman Martin Chernin’sRead More

Talkin ‘Bout Remuneration (Part I)

Talkin ‘Bout Remuneration (Part I)

November 14, 2018 at 11:23 am

Mayor Cecil Clarke’s contention that discussing council remuneration in camera (and treating elected officials as “personnel”) is a longstanding CBRM practice sent me scuttling to the “CBRM Mayor and Council” clippings file at the McConnell library this past week, where the first thing I discovered was that controversy over theRead More

Letter to the Editor: Breaching Governing Legislation

Letter to the Editor: Breaching Governing Legislation

November 14, 2018 at 11:15 am

In recent published comments, Mayor Cecil Clarke suggested that because the Municipal Government Act (MGA) was ignored in the past it is perfectly acceptable for our current elected representatives to continue thumbing a collective nose at a statutory mandate to follow the rules. What the Mayor and Council repeatedly didRead...

Fast & Curious: Short Takes on Random Things

Fast & Curious: Short Takes on Random Things

November 9, 2018 at 10:00 am

In camera The CBC’s Tom Ayers doesn’t seem to like closed doors any more than I do and this week he kicked one open (figuratively, not literally) at the Cape Breton Regional Municipality. Ayers reported on Thursday that the CBRM Council has discussed its own compensation in secret four timesRead More

Civic Centre, CBRM

When A Raise Is Not A Raise — Or Is It?

November 7, 2018 at 1:02 pm

There are two ways to look at CBRM Council’s decision, taken during Monday’s General Committee meeting, to increase the mayor and councilors’ salaries to compensate for the federal government’s decision (contained in that gripping bestseller Budget 2017: Building a Strong Middle Class) to eliminate a tax break that allowed themRead More

Civic Centre, CBRM

There’s Cecil

October 31, 2018 at 1:19 pm

Well, that’s all she wrote, folks. CBRM Mayor Cecil Clarke’s pursuit of the provincial Progressive Conservative Party leadership ended after the first ballot on Saturday, when rival Tim Houston came within 54 points of winning and Clarke bowed out. It was an abrupt ending to a campaign that seemed likeRead More

Clarke on Carbon Pricing: Ready to Lead?

Clarke on Carbon Pricing: Ready to Lead?

October 24, 2018 at 12:51 pm

Cecil Clarke is not the only anti-carbon tax politician in the current landscape; in fact, he’s arguably just the homegrown version of a familiar figure on the political scene — the “Canadian conservative” who, as Dalhousie economist Lars Osberg puts it, hasĀ “successfully framed” the federal government’s carbon-pricing system as aRead More